Events

    4 Jun Fairy Garden Class

    Where do fairies live? At your house in the fairy garden you’ll create for them. This class is designed for adults, who may bring children or grandchildren who are at least 8 years old to help with the creative process. It is small, intricate work, so please bear that in mind when bringing children. Registration is required, with the deadline of June 1, by calling 1-877-243-9268. The maximum class size is 15. We’ll use items from nature to create a fairy house from a small gourd, twig furniture, arbors and/or bridges and a maple seed dragon fly. The only limit is your imagination. We will supply the gourds, plants and other items and you supply the container, which can range from floral containers to antiques such as enamel ware bowls and pots. The containers should be at least 12 inches wide but no larger than 18 inches wide. Bring other items you’d like to add too!

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    Location: Kansas Wetlands Education Center, 592 NE K-156 Highway, Great Bend, KS
    Time: 9:30 AM


    5 Jun Craft Series: Nature Prints

    Bring nature indoors with this unique project.  Choose your own natural objects and colors to create a one of a kind art piece for your home.  We’ll collect our own materials on the KWEC nature trail, and you’ll go home with ready to hang art! Give us a call today at 1-877-243-9268 to register for this fun, FREE craft workshop!

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    Location: Kansas Wetlands Education Center, 592 NE K-156 Highway, Great Bend, KS
    Time: 2:00 PM


    25 Jun Cheyenne Bottoms Naturalists: Gardening with Native Plants

    Adding native plants to your garden is a great way to improve wildlife habitat. Native plants provide food and shelter for wildlife in several ways, including producing seeds and nectar as well as being hosts for native insects. Additionally, native plants will provide what wildlife needs at the right time. Many introduced and exotic garden plants either don’t provide what wildlife needs at all, or produce it too early or too late to do wildlife any good. As an extra bonus, hardy native species are usually more drought tolerant, and take much less care and watering than exotic garden plants. Have we piqued your interest?  If you want to know more about gardening with native plants, come out to the KWEC for a fun, FREE morning of gardening.  Enjoy browsing our pollinator garden while you sip a refreshing summer spritzer, and take home your own native plant seeds, along with tons of great information on gardening with natives. No registration is needed for this fun, FREE program!  If you've got questions, give us a call at 1-877-243-9268.

    Is

    1. Adding native plants to your garden is a great way to improve wildlife habitat. Native plants provide food and shelter for wildlife in several ways, including producing seeds and nectar as well as being hosts for native insects. Additionally, native plants will provide what wildlife needs at the right time. Many introduced and exotic garden plants either don’t provide what wildlife needs at all, or produce it too early or too late to do wildlife any good. As an extra bonus, hardy native species are usually more drought tolerant, and take much less care and watering than exotic garden plants.