Events

    30 Apr The Great Migration Rally

    Every other year, the Kansas Wetlands Education Center celebrates spring migration with The Great Migration Rally.  The next Great Migration Rally event is scheduled for Saturday, April 30, 2016.  Please check back soon or call the KWEC for more details about this year’s event!  “It’s an event modified from one of our activities that features migration,” said Curtis Wolf, KWEC manager. “The concept is to provide information about the hazards birds face during migration with a fun and entertaining approach.” Participants start off by drawing a “bird” card, worth so many points. The rarer the species, the more points it is worth. “Each bird is a species that migrates through Cheyenne Bottoms,” Wolf said. After beginning their “migration”, driving through Cheyenne Bottoms, participants stop at three different points, picking up situational cards that describe a positive or negative circumstance. The positive cards, such as finding a good food source, add points. The negative cards, such as losing a wetland to development, subtract points. At the migration destination, Barton Community College’s Camp Aldrich, the migrants choose one last card, points are tabulated and those with the highest points win prizes (see photos below). Many of the prizes encourage outdoor activities – such as tents, fishing poles, and binoculars. In addition several area businesses donate gift certificates and area artists donate pieces. A separate educational activity dealing with bird identification, historical happenings at Cheyenne Bottoms, re-enactors, or games occurs at each stop. The migration activity is one of many during the event.  Additionally, falconer Nate Mathews will give a program with his golden eagle, Isaiah. Mathews, currently the only falconer in Kansas hunting with an eagle, will share the remarkable story of Isaiah’s capture, training, loss and recovery along with other information about eagles and other raptors at Camp Aldrich. Several activities take place at KWEC before the migration portion of the event takes place. There are also crafts for kids and adults and other activities will be available.

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    Location: Kansas Wetlands Education Center, 592 NE K-156 Highway, Great Bend, KS
    Time: 9:00 AM


    21 May Photography Workshop with Boyd Norton

    Saturday May 21, 2016 the Kansas Wetlands Education Center along with the Central Kansas Photography Club will sponsor a day-long photography workshop. The workshop will feature Boyd Norton, renowned photographer and founder and co-director of Serengeti Watch, a 501(c)3 non-profit for saving the Serengeti ecosystem. The workshop runs from 9 a.m to 4 p.m. at the Kansas Wetlands Education Center. SEMINAR TOPICS INCLUDE:

    • Picture Dynamics and Composition
    • Light
    • Lenses and Perspective
    • Creativity
    • Conservation Photography: You Can Make a Difference
    • Copyright: Why it Matters
    • How not to Become a Professional Photographer
    2016 Photography Workshop - May 21, 2016
    Download the Registration Form here: CKPC 2016 Registration-Boyd Norton
    Photographer and author Boyd Norton has been chosen as the 2015 recipient of the Sierra Club's prestigious Ansel Adams award for his use of "superlative photography" for conservation causes over a lifetime. His work in protecting wildlife and wilderness has spanned the globe. Norton is the photographer and author of 16 books, ranging in topics from African elephants to mountain gorillas, and from Siberia's Lake Baikal to the Serengeti ecosystem. His recent award-winning book, SERENGETI: THE ETERNAL BEGINNING, won high praise from Jane Goodall and Richard Engel of NBC News, among many others. His next book, CONSERVATION PHOTOGRAPHY: THE ART OF SAVING OUR PLANET ONE PHOTOGRAPH AT A TIME, is due for publication in early 2016. He is at work on three more books. Throughout his nearly 50 years of photography and writing and environmental activism he has played a key role in the establishment of several wilderness areas in the Rocky Mountains, new national parks in Alaska, and in the designation of Siberia's Lake Baikal as a World Heritage Site.   Learn more about Boyd Norton at www.wildernessphotography.com.

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    Location: Kansas Wetlands Education Center, 592 NE K-156 Highway, Great Bend, KS
    Time: 9:00 AM


    5 Jun Craft Series: Nature Prints

    Bring nature indoors with this unique project.  Choose your own natural objects and colors to create a one of a kind art piece for your home.  We’ll collect our own materials on the KWEC nature trail, and you’ll go home with ready to hang art! Give us a call today at 1-877-243-9268 to register for this fun, FREE craft workshop!

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    Location: Kansas Wetlands Education Center, 592 NE K-156 Highway, Great Bend, KS
    Time: 2:00 PM


    25 Jun Cheyenne Bottoms Naturalists: Gardening with Native Plants

    Adding native plants to your garden is a great way to improve wildlife habitat. Native plants provide food and shelter for wildlife in several ways, including producing seeds and nectar as well as being hosts for native insects. Additionally, native plants will provide what wildlife needs at the right time. Many introduced and exotic garden plants either don’t provide what wildlife needs at all, or produce it too early or too late to do wildlife any good. As an extra bonus, hardy native species are usually more drought tolerant, and take much less care and watering than exotic garden plants. Have we piqued your interest?  If you want to know more about gardening with native plants, come out to the KWEC for a fun, FREE morning of gardening.  Enjoy browsing our pollinator garden while you sip a refreshing summer spritzer, and take home your own native plant seeds, along with tons of great information on gardening with natives. No registration is needed for this fun, FREE program!  If you've got questions, give us a call at 1-877-243-9268.

    Is

    1. Adding native plants to your garden is a great way to improve wildlife habitat. Native plants provide food and shelter for wildlife in several ways, including producing seeds and nectar as well as being hosts for native insects. Additionally, native plants will provide what wildlife needs at the right time. Many introduced and exotic garden plants either don’t provide what wildlife needs at all, or produce it too early or too late to do wildlife any good. As an extra bonus, hardy native species are usually more drought tolerant, and take much less care and watering than exotic garden plants.